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Your Build - Winter 2017

Phase2 Framing Your Build Joist tournament Phase2 Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 The methods used to construct new floors have come on in leaps and bounds in the last decade. Timber may no longer be our material of choice for the ground floor but it remains our go-to for first floor joists and roof structure. With developments in construction technology, self-builders have several options when it comes to choosing their floor structure – softwood joists, I-joists and metal web joists. Timber frame expert, Steve Griffiths, senior design manager at Taylor Lane Timber Frame, explores the joist options for new build homes… Softwood Joists – the traditional choice A traditional timber floor using kiln-dried softwood – usually pine – is an enduring, popular choice with self-builders and developers. Softwood joists are a relatively inexpensive option; simple to build with and easy to adapt on site. They are ideal for smaller builds where relatively short spans are required. Softwood joists are normally supplied in standard sizes such as 195 x 45mm but depending upon the spans involved, they can be supplied in 70 or 90mm widths. A softwood joist typically spans around 4.5 metres. Joist ends must be supported using steel joist hangers – which can often be supplied by the timber frame or joist provider – rather than embedded into the wall. The joists also need to be braced using wooden blocking or steel struts to prevent wobbling and instability. I-Joists – for quiet floors I-joists, otherwise known as I-beams are a factory-made, structurally engineered timber product. The timber joist has an I-shaped crosssection comprising top and bottom flanges made of softwood or LVT (laminated veneer timber) fixed to a tall vertical web of OSB (oriented strand board) or similar. They are produced from reformed timber fibres which help to ensure consistency, 40 Winter 2017


Your Build - Winter 2017
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